Category Archives: Conference Contributions

Achieving Equilibrium: Use of Multiple Spaces and Media by FLOSS Workers to Improve Work-Life Balance

Title: Achieving Equilibrium: Use of Multiple Spaces and Media by FLOSS Workers to Improve Work-Life Balance

Authors: Aditya Johri, George Mason University, and Hon Jie Teo, New York College of Technology

Abstract: Participants in FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software) projects are atypical in their collaborative practices given the high demand for virtual work. Through a study of workers from two organizations working on FLOSS projects we identify the boundaries, in terms of productivity and quality of life, of virtual work and actions workers take in order to find a work-life balance. We found that although workers valued the flexibility of working from home, they had difficulty focusing on their work for sustained time periods and often felt isolated. This motivated them to use coworking spaces – physical spaces used as work space by workers not on the same team or even the same firm – as a critical part of their space ecology. In conjunction with their media ecology – a mix of communication technologies including IRC – the space/media mix allowed them to balance their work and personal lives. We draw implications for better supporting FLOSS and virtual work practices through design of media/space and work practices.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

Examining the Impact of Adopting Open Source Principles Inside Organisations

Title: Examining the Impact of Adopting Open Source Principles Inside Organisations

Authors: Noel Carroll, Lorraine Morgan and Kieran Conboy, LERO & NUI Galway

Abstract: Open Source software (OSS) has been highly prevalent in both practice and research. Given the value and effectiveness of OSS development to date, practitioners are keen to replicate these practices inside their respective corporations. This application of OSS practices inside the confines of a corporate entity has been coined Inner Source Software (ISS). While ISS presents many benefits, little is known about the opposing tensions that arise as a result of transitioning from a closed to an open software development environment. Such environments are increasingly under pressure to embrace more open and collaborative principles internally, while simultaneously managing operations in a tight and controlled manner. As part of this study, we conducted 20 interviews with international ISS expects across 15 global organisations. We uncover 13 core tensions that arise from the adoption of open principles in closed software practices. Based on these emerging results, we present new insights on the implementation of strategies to overcome competing tensions from openness in software development. We present some recommendations, which also call for fundamentally new research directions.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

An Investigation into Inner Source Software Development: Preliminary Findings from a Systematic Literature Review

Title: An Investigation into Inner Source Software Development: Preliminary Findings from a Systematic Literature Review

Authors: Henry Edison, Noel Carroll, Kieran Conboy and Lorraine Morgan, LERO & NUI Galway

Abstract: Given the value and effectiveness of open source software development to date, practitioners are keen to replicate these practices inside their respective corporations. This application of open source practices inside the confines of a corporate entity has been coined inner source software development. However, while organisations have found ways to directly benefit from revenue streams as a result of leveraging open source practices internally, the current research on inner source is scattered among different areas. Thus gaining clarity on the state-of-the-art in inner source research is challenging. In particular, there is no systematic literature review of known research to date on inner source. We address this challenge by presenting a systematic literature review that identifies, critically evaluates and integrates the findings of 29 primary studies on inner source. Case study approach is the common research approach undertaken in the area. We also identified 8 frameworks/methods, models and tools proposed in the literature to support inner source, as well as a set of benefits and challenges associated with inner source. We envision future work to perform deeper analysis and synthesis on the empirical research on inner source software development.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

Developing sustainable Open Science solutions in the frame of EU funded research: the OpenUP case

Title: Developing sustainable Open Science solutions in the frame of EU funded research: the OpenUP case

Authors: Eleni Toli, Electra Sifacaki, Natalia Manola, Tony Ross-Hellauer, Edit Görögh, Michela Vignoli, Viltė Banelytė, Paolo Manghi, Saskia Woutersen-Windhouwer and Yannis Ioannidis

Abstract: Open Access and Open Scholarship have revolutionized the way scholarly artefacts are evaluated and published, while the introduction of new technologies and media in scientific workflows has changed the “how” and to “whom” science is communicated, and how stakeholders interact with the scientific community and the broader public. The EU funded project OpenUP is connecting people, information and tools and provides a knowledge hub and a validated framework for the review, assessment and dissemination aspects of the research lifecycle, under the prism of a gender-sensitive Open Science.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

Sustainable digitalisation through different dimensions of openness: how can lock-in, interoperability, and long-term maintenance of IT systems be addressed?

Title: Sustainable digitalisation through different dimensions of openness: how can lock-in, interoperability, and long-term maintenance of IT systems be addressed?

Authors: Björn Lundell and Jonas Gamalielsson, University of Skövde

Abstract: Lock-in, interoperability, and long-term maintenance are three fundamental challenges that need to be addressed by any organisation involved in development, use and procurement of IT systems. This paper clarifies fundamental concepts and key dimensions of openness and provides examples of work-practices and recommendations for achieving sustainable digitalisation through addressing the fundamental challenges. Specifically, there are three main contributions. First, the concepts open standard, open source software, and open content are clarified and elaborated. Second, the associated three dimensions standard, software, and content are elaborated through examples of how different combinations along the dimensions can enable and inhibit sustainable digitalisation when IT-systems are developed and procured. Third, work-practices used by public sector organisations in specific projects for development and procurement of IT-systems are elaborated with the view to discuss how the three fundamental challenges are being addressed and provide guidance for how organisations can achieve a sustainable digitalisation.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

A Wikia census: motives, tools and insights

Title: A Wikia census: motives, tools and insights

Authors: Guillermo Jimenez-Diaz, Abel Serrano and Javier Arroyo, Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Abstract: Understanding the Wikisphere phenomenon is undoubtedly of great interest. Most of the studies focus in Wikipedia and its generalization to other wikis requires an enormous amount of work in terms of selecting and retrieving the data. To facilitate the analysis of other wikis we developed a set of tools to collect and create a census of Wikia, one of the largest and most diverse repository of wikis, which hosts more than 300,000 wikis. In this work, we carry out a preliminary quantitative analysis of the census, emphasizing on the differences between active and inactive wikis. Additionally, we provide the wiki research community with the census and the scripts employed to retrieve the data, facilitating others to reproduce or reuse it.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

Lessons Learned on Data Preparation for Geographic Information Systems using Open Data 

Title: Lessons Learned on Data Preparation for Geographic Information Systems using Open Data  

Author: Jun Iio, Chuo University

Abstract: The use of geographic information systems (GISs) has become widespread in data-driven industries, and they are utilized to visualize various kinds of spatial data using mappings. In addition to the large amount of available open-source GIS software, various types of data (e.g., boundary data for administrative regions, numerical data for individual areas, and data representing the objects on a map) are provided by local governments as open data. However, in many cases, the data have been inadequately maintained. Thus, advance preparation is required to utilize the data effectively. This paper discusses the work required to utilize open data by considering the case studies of Hachioji-city, Tokyo, Japan.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

Reducing Knowledge Loss in Open Source Software

Title: Reducing Knowledge Loss in Open Source Software

Author: Mehvish Rashid: Lero, DCU

Abstract: Contributor turnover leads to knowledge loss in OSS projects. The structure of the OSS community is transient in nature, yet continual maintenance of OSS projects is required for their sustainability. Even though knowledge creation and sharing is abundant, knowledge is not evenly distributed among contributors. Only a small subset of contributors called core members make major code contributions in OSS projects. It is costly for a contributor to maintain code from other contributors on the project and to seek out assistance and information required, resulting in productivity loss. Knowledge retention mechanisms, we suggest, could be improved in OSS projects. The objective of our work is to integrate the concept of knowledge retention in OSS projects. The challenge is how to apply concepts of knowledge management in such a dynamic community with a transient workforce.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2017 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

A Crowdsourcing Practices Framework for Science Funding Calls / Processes

Title: A Crowdsourcing Practices Framework for Science Funding Calls / Processes

Author: Eoin Cullina: Lero NUI Galway

Abstract: Public scientific research funding agencies (funding agencies) are charged with the task of implementing government science policy and identifying research projects worthy of funding. They play an important role in creating value for society through funding research and informing research policy. However, the work of funding agencies in recent years has been hampered by various challenges in call processes. This research proposes crowdsourcing as a potential solution for funding agencies. Information systems research has engaged with crowdsourcing and the open innovation phenomenon. Crowdsourcing has been utilised by both private organisations and governments in the seeking solutions to similar types of challenges. Despite this fact, no crowdsourcing frameworks have been adapted to address the types of challenges faced by funding agencies in call processes. This research seeks to identify challenges faced by funding agencies for the purposes adapting a crowdsourcing practices framework to address these challenges.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2017 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

It’s About Time: Applying Temporality to Software Development Teams

Title: It’s About Time: Applying Temporality to Software Development Teams

Author: Mairead O’Connor:Lero NUI Galway

Abstract: Most existing software development research adopts a very simplistic, ‘clock-based’ mechanistic interpretation of time and ignores the highly complex, multi-faceted, subtle and socially embedded nature of temporality. This is a significant limitation given that software development is a highly complex, socially embedded activity. This research applies temporality theory to examine software development teams. This research contributes to research and practice by (i) identifying any gaps, misconceptions or general conceptual issues in the application of temporal concepts to software development to date, (ii) examining the complexity of temporality that exist within software development teams (iii) examining the impact that such complexity may have, and (iv) identify strategies for resolving these temporality issues in software development. To achieve the objective of this study, the comprehensive temporality framework proposed by Ancona et al., (2001) is used to understand the various components of temporality within the context of software development

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2017 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.