Category Archives: OpenSym 2018

Achieving Equilibrium: Use of Multiple Spaces and Media by FLOSS Workers to Improve Work-Life Balance

Title: Achieving Equilibrium: Use of Multiple Spaces and Media by FLOSS Workers to Improve Work-Life Balance

Authors: Aditya Johri, George Mason University, and Hon Jie Teo, New York College of Technology

Abstract: Participants in FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software) projects are atypical in their collaborative practices given the high demand for virtual work. Through a study of workers from two organizations working on FLOSS projects we identify the boundaries, in terms of productivity and quality of life, of virtual work and actions workers take in order to find a work-life balance. We found that although workers valued the flexibility of working from home, they had difficulty focusing on their work for sustained time periods and often felt isolated. This motivated them to use coworking spaces – physical spaces used as work space by workers not on the same team or even the same firm – as a critical part of their space ecology. In conjunction with their media ecology – a mix of communication technologies including IRC – the space/media mix allowed them to balance their work and personal lives. We draw implications for better supporting FLOSS and virtual work practices through design of media/space and work practices.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

Examining the Impact of Adopting Open Source Principles Inside Organisations

Title: Examining the Impact of Adopting Open Source Principles Inside Organisations

Authors: Noel Carroll, Lorraine Morgan and Kieran Conboy, LERO & NUI Galway

Abstract: Open Source software (OSS) has been highly prevalent in both practice and research. Given the value and effectiveness of OSS development to date, practitioners are keen to replicate these practices inside their respective corporations. This application of OSS practices inside the confines of a corporate entity has been coined Inner Source Software (ISS). While ISS presents many benefits, little is known about the opposing tensions that arise as a result of transitioning from a closed to an open software development environment. Such environments are increasingly under pressure to embrace more open and collaborative principles internally, while simultaneously managing operations in a tight and controlled manner. As part of this study, we conducted 20 interviews with international ISS expects across 15 global organisations. We uncover 13 core tensions that arise from the adoption of open principles in closed software practices. Based on these emerging results, we present new insights on the implementation of strategies to overcome competing tensions from openness in software development. We present some recommendations, which also call for fundamentally new research directions.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

An Investigation into Inner Source Software Development: Preliminary Findings from a Systematic Literature Review

Title: An Investigation into Inner Source Software Development: Preliminary Findings from a Systematic Literature Review

Authors: Henry Edison, Noel Carroll, Kieran Conboy and Lorraine Morgan, LERO & NUI Galway

Abstract: Given the value and effectiveness of open source software development to date, practitioners are keen to replicate these practices inside their respective corporations. This application of open source practices inside the confines of a corporate entity has been coined inner source software development. However, while organisations have found ways to directly benefit from revenue streams as a result of leveraging open source practices internally, the current research on inner source is scattered among different areas. Thus gaining clarity on the state-of-the-art in inner source research is challenging. In particular, there is no systematic literature review of known research to date on inner source. We address this challenge by presenting a systematic literature review that identifies, critically evaluates and integrates the findings of 29 primary studies on inner source. Case study approach is the common research approach undertaken in the area. We also identified 8 frameworks/methods, models and tools proposed in the literature to support inner source, as well as a set of benefits and challenges associated with inner source. We envision future work to perform deeper analysis and synthesis on the empirical research on inner source software development.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

Developing sustainable Open Science solutions in the frame of EU funded research: the OpenUP case

Title: Developing sustainable Open Science solutions in the frame of EU funded research: the OpenUP case

Authors: Eleni Toli, Electra Sifacaki, Natalia Manola, Tony Ross-Hellauer, Edit Görögh, Michela Vignoli, Viltė Banelytė, Paolo Manghi, Saskia Woutersen-Windhouwer and Yannis Ioannidis

Abstract: Open Access and Open Scholarship have revolutionized the way scholarly artefacts are evaluated and published, while the introduction of new technologies and media in scientific workflows has changed the “how” and to “whom” science is communicated, and how stakeholders interact with the scientific community and the broader public. The EU funded project OpenUP is connecting people, information and tools and provides a knowledge hub and a validated framework for the review, assessment and dissemination aspects of the research lifecycle, under the prism of a gender-sensitive Open Science.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

Sustainable digitalisation through different dimensions of openness: how can lock-in, interoperability, and long-term maintenance of IT systems be addressed?

Title: Sustainable digitalisation through different dimensions of openness: how can lock-in, interoperability, and long-term maintenance of IT systems be addressed?

Authors: Björn Lundell and Jonas Gamalielsson, University of Skövde

Abstract: Lock-in, interoperability, and long-term maintenance are three fundamental challenges that need to be addressed by any organisation involved in development, use and procurement of IT systems. This paper clarifies fundamental concepts and key dimensions of openness and provides examples of work-practices and recommendations for achieving sustainable digitalisation through addressing the fundamental challenges. Specifically, there are three main contributions. First, the concepts open standard, open source software, and open content are clarified and elaborated. Second, the associated three dimensions standard, software, and content are elaborated through examples of how different combinations along the dimensions can enable and inhibit sustainable digitalisation when IT-systems are developed and procured. Third, work-practices used by public sector organisations in specific projects for development and procurement of IT-systems are elaborated with the view to discuss how the three fundamental challenges are being addressed and provide guidance for how organisations can achieve a sustainable digitalisation.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

A Wikia census: motives, tools and insights

Title: A Wikia census: motives, tools and insights

Authors: Guillermo Jimenez-Diaz, Abel Serrano and Javier Arroyo, Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Abstract: Understanding the Wikisphere phenomenon is undoubtedly of great interest. Most of the studies focus in Wikipedia and its generalization to other wikis requires an enormous amount of work in terms of selecting and retrieving the data. To facilitate the analysis of other wikis we developed a set of tools to collect and create a census of Wikia, one of the largest and most diverse repository of wikis, which hosts more than 300,000 wikis. In this work, we carry out a preliminary quantitative analysis of the census, emphasizing on the differences between active and inactive wikis. Additionally, we provide the wiki research community with the census and the scripts employed to retrieve the data, facilitating others to reproduce or reuse it.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

Lessons Learned on Data Preparation for Geographic Information Systems using Open Data 

Title: Lessons Learned on Data Preparation for Geographic Information Systems using Open Data  

Author: Jun Iio, Chuo University

Abstract: The use of geographic information systems (GISs) has become widespread in data-driven industries, and they are utilized to visualize various kinds of spatial data using mappings. In addition to the large amount of available open-source GIS software, various types of data (e.g., boundary data for administrative regions, numerical data for individual areas, and data representing the objects on a map) are provided by local governments as open data. However, in many cases, the data have been inadequately maintained. Thus, advance preparation is required to utilize the data effectively. This paper discusses the work required to utilize open data by considering the case studies of Hachioji-city, Tokyo, Japan.

Download: This contribution is part of the OpenSym 2018 proceedings and is available as a PDF file.

OpenSym 2018 Call for Papers (regular papers)

Submission deadline: March 15, 2018, 23h59, any time on Earth

All the submissions are done via the EasyChair platform, here: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=opensym2018

About the Conference

The 14th International Symposium on Open Collaboration (OpenSym 2018) is the premier conference on open collaboration research and practice, including open source, open data, open science, open education, wikis and related social media, Wikipedia, and IT-driven open innovation research.

OpenSym is the only conference that brings together the different strands of open collaboration research and practice, seeking to create synergies and inspire new collaborations between people from computer science, information science, social science, humanities, and everyone interested in understanding open collaboration and how it is changing our society.

This year’s conference will be held in Paris, France on August 22-24, 2018.  A Doctoral Symposium will take place on August 21, 2018.

Topics

We are looking for submissions on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Open Collaboration Research, esp. Wikis and Social Media
    • Novel open collaboration technologies ranging from entirely new socio-technical systems to MediaWiki extensions
    • Wikis in corporations, academia, non-profits, and other organizations
    • Online collaboration using social media technologies (e.g., Wikis, Blogs, Twitter)
    • Theoretical work on open collaboration
    • Digital divides and open collaboration technologies
  • Free/Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS)
    • FLOSS development communities, including both software engineering aspects and human factors
    • FLOSS development processes, such as code reviews, joining process, etc.
  • Open Data, Open Access, and Open Science
    • Open data quality, standards, measures and metrics
    • Open data and open science methods, applications and prototypes
    • Best practices and case studies for Open Data and Open Science
    • Repositories, networks and working platforms for open scientific communication, collaboration, exchange and access to open knowledge
  • Open Education
    • Tools and methods for managing, storing and sharing of Open Educational Resources (OER)
    • Open online learning environments such as MOOCs
    • Enabling individual learning paths
    • Connecting formal and informal learning
    • Supporting self-paced learning and co-construction of knowledge
    • Development of new knowledge or products (e.g. Maker Spaces), collecting data (e.g. Citizen Science) or discussing political topics (e.g. e-participation).
  • IT-Driven Open Innovation
    • Architecture and design of open innovation systems
    • The role of IT-artifacts in open and collaborative innovation activities
    • Implementation of open innovation platforms in corporate IT landscapes
    • IT security, intellectual property and personal anonymity in open innovation
    • Open innovation and GLAM
  • Open Policy/Open Government
    • Open policy formulation and design
    • Implications of open policies for governments
    • Implementation of open policies
    • Measuring the success and impact of open policies
    • Best practices and cases studies of open policy/government
    • Openness in various public initiatives (e.g. Smart Cities, Internet of Things etc.)
    • Open Law
  • Wikipedia and Wikimedia Research
    • Participation in Wikimedia communities
    • Group Dynamics and Organization in Wikipedia and related projects
    • Readership/Engagement on Wikipedia and related projects
    • Technical Infrastructure and Design in Wikimedia projects
    • Evaluating Content of Wikimedia projects
    • Knowledge Diffusion, Outreach, and Generalization

Submission Information and Instructions

All the submissions are done via the EasyChair platform, here: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=opensym2018

Paper Presentation: OpenSym 2018 will be organized as a one track conference in order to emphasize the interdisciplinary character of this conference and to encourage discussion.

Submission Deadline: The research paper submission deadline is March 15th 2018. Submitted papers should present integrative reviews or original reports of substantive new work: theoretical, empirical, and/or in the design, development and/or deployment of novel concepts, systems, and mechanisms. Research papers will be reviewed to meet rigorous academic standards of publication. Papers will be reviewed for relevance, conceptual quality, innovation and clarity of presentation.

Paper Length: There is no minimum or maximum length for submitted papers. Rather, reviewers will be instructed to weigh the contribution of a paper relative to its length. Papers should report research thoroughly but succinctly: brevity is a virtue. A typical length of a “long research paper” is 10 pages (formerly the maximum length limit and the limit on OpenSym tracks), but may be shorter if the contribution can be described and supported in fewer pages—shorter, more focused papers (called “short research papers” previously) are encouraged and will be reviewed like any other paper. While we will review papers longer than 10 pages, the contribution must warrant the extra length. Reviewers will be instructed to reject papers whose length is incommensurate with the size of their contribution. Papers should be formatted in ACM SIGCHI paper format. Reviewing is not double-blind so manuscripts do not need to be anonymized.

Posters: As in previous years, OpenSym will also be hosting a poster session at the conference. To propose a poster, authors should submit an extended abstract (not more than 4 pages) describing the content of the poster which will be published in a non-archival companion proceedings to the conference. Posters should use the ACM SIGCHI templates for extended abstracts. An example of a poster abstract can be found here. Reviewing is not double-blind so abstracts do not need to be anonymized.

Paper Proceedings: OpenSym is held in-cooperation with ACM SIGWEB and ACM SIGSOFT and the conference proceedings will be archived in the ACM digital library like all prior editions. OpenSym seeks to accommodate the needs of the different research disciplines it draws on including disciplines with archival conference proceedings and disciplines where authors usually present at conferences and publish later. Authors, whose submitted papers have been accepted for presentation at the conference have a choice of:

  • having their paper become part of the official proceedings, archived in the ACM Digital Library,
  • having their paper published in the conference website only, with no transfer of copyright from the authors,
  • having no publication record at all but only the presentation at the conference.

Response from authors: For the second time at OpenSym, authors will be given the opportunity to write a response to their reviews before final decisions are made. This should be treated as an opportunity to correct any mistakes or misconceptions in the reviews as well as to propose minor changes that the authors can make during the two weeks between notification and the camera-ready deadline.

 

Important Dates

  • Submission deadline: March 15, 2018 (regular papers),
  • Reviews sent to authors: May 11, 2018
  • Response to reviews from authors due: May 20, 2018
  • Final decision notification: June 15, 2018
  • Camera-ready papers due: June 22, 2018
  • Papers available online: July 13, 2018

Conference Organization

The general chairs of the conference are Nicolas Jullien and Olivier Berger, IMT, France. Feel free to contact us with any questions you might have at info@opensym.org.

The program chair is Matt Germonprez (University of Nebraska at Omaha). The Organizational Chair is Ghislaine Le Gall (IMT Atlantique). Associate Chairs and program committee members will be listed here as the committee is finalized.

Industry and Community Track

Defined as “collaboration that is egalitarian (everyone can join, no principled or artificial barriers to participation exist), meritocratic (decisions and status are merit-based rather than imposed) and self-organizing (processes adapt to people rather than people adapt to pre-defined processes)”, we are seeking community contributions that best exemplify this definition of open collaboration.

Industry and community contributions can stem from and address the different open collaboration domains such as:

  • Free, libre, and open source software projects and practice
  • Open data projects and practice
  • Open access projects and practice
  • Open Law
  • IT-driven open innovation projects and practice
  • Wikipedia and related Wikimedia foundation projects and practice
  • Open science and education
  • Other open collaboration (wikis, social media, etc.) projects and practice
  • Open innovation in general

Types of Community Track Submissions

The following types of papers can be submitted to the community track:

  • Experience reports long and short: A regular presentation slot (30min) will be provided
  • Workshop proposals: A workshop slot (half-day or full-day) will be provided
  • Panel proposals: A session (90min) discussion slot for the panel will be provided
  • Demo proposals: Space and time is provided during the demo session (90min)
  • Tutorial proposals: A tutorial slot (90min) will be provided at the conference

Submissions are reviewed by the community track committee for their interest to the OpenSym community in general. For questions about community track submissions, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

Experience Reports

Experience reports are an integral part of the conference program. These are opportunities to discuss how ideas that sound good on paper (and at conferences!) work in real life. Many attendees want to learn from people on the front lines what it is like to do things like start a company wiki, run an open source project, or build a political campaign using open collaboration systems.

Experience reports are not research papers; their goal is to present experience and reflections on a particular case, and they are reviewed for usefulness, clarity and reflection. Strong experience reports discuss both benefits and drawbacks of the approaches used and clearly call out lessons learned. Reports may focus on a particular aspect of technology usage and practice, or describe broad project experiences.

Short experience reports may be 2-4 pages long, long experience reports may be 5-10 pages long. At the conference, a regular presentation slot (30min) will be provided.

Workshops

Workshops provide an opportunity for researchers and practitioners to discuss and learn about topics that require in-depth, extended engagement such as new systems, research methods, standards, and formats.

Workshop proposals should describe what you intend to do and how your session will meet the criteria described above. It should include a concise abstract, proposed time frame (half-day or full-day), what you plan to do during the workshop, and one-paragraph biographies of all organizers.

Workshop proposals will be reviewed and selected for their interest to the community. Each accepted workshop will be provided with a meeting room for either a half or full day. Organizers may also request technology and materials (projector, flip pads, etc).

A workshop proposal may be up to 4 pages long. At the conference, a workshop slot (half-day or full-day) will be provided.

Panels

Panels provide an interactive forum for bringing together people with interesting points of view to discuss compelling issues around open collaboration. Panels involve participation from both the panelists and audience members in a lively discussion. Proposals for panels should describe the topics and goals and explain how the panel will be organized and how the OpenSym community will benefit. It should include a concise abstract and one-paragraph biographies of panelists and moderators. Panel submissions will be reviewed and selected for their interest to the community.

A panel proposal may be up to 4 pages long. At the conference, a session (90min) discussion slot for the panel will be provided.

Demos

No format is better suited for demonstrating the utility of new collaboration technologies than showing and using them. Demonstrations give presenters an opportunity to show running systems and gather feedback. Demo submissions should provide a setup for the demo, a specific description of what you plan to demo, what you hope to get out of demoing, and how the audience will benefit. A short note of any special technical requirements should be included. Demo submissions will be reviewed based on their relevance to the community.

A demo proposal may be up to 2 pages long. At the conference, space and time will be provided at the demo session (90min).

Tutorials

Tutorials tutorials are half-day classes, taught by experts, designed to help professionals rapidly come up to speed on a specific technology or methodology. Tutorials can be lecture-oriented or participatory. Tutorial attendees deserve the highest standard of excellence in tutorial preparation and delivery. Tutorial presenters are typically experts in their chosen topic and experienced speakers skilled in preparing and delivering educational presentations. When selecting tutorials, we will consider the presenter’s knowledge of the proposed topic and past success at teaching it.

A tutorial proposal may be up to 4 pages long. At the conference, a tutorial slot (90min) will be provided.

Submission Information and Instructions

Submissions should follow the standard ACM proceedings format. All papers must conform at time of submission to the formatting instructions and must not exceed the page limits, including all text, references, appendices and figures. All submissions must in PDF format.

All papers and posters should be submitted electronically through EasyChair using https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=opensym2018

Authors should submit by the first submission deadline to ensure that space is left at the conference. A second later deadline will allow for a limited number of submissions to be considered for inclusion in the conference as well.

  • First submission deadline: April 22nd, 2018
  • First notification to authors: May 10th, 2018

As long as it is April 22nd, 2018, somewhere on earth, your submission will be accepted.

Community Track Committee

Committee Chairs

Benjamin Jean (Inno 3)

Olivier Berger (IMT-Telecom Sud Paris)

Committee Members

To be announced

Doctoral Symposium at OpenSym

For whom is this?

What is this?

The doctoral symposium is an opportunity to get feedback on your ideas and/or work-so-far from experts and doctoral candidates within and outside your own discipline.

How does it work?

  • You write a short exposé on your work as described on the submission types page.
  • You submit it (as PDF) to Easychair on or before  2018-04-15, AoE.
  • You will be notified of acceptance or rejection on 2016-05-27
    (we do not expect the doctoral symposium to be very selective; we expect to reject primarily submissions that are off-topic or have too little content to allow helpful discussion).
  • If accepted, you should submit a final version of your submission until 2016-06-03, again via Easychair.
  • If accepted, you come and present your topic and work
    (details on this will follow; do not forget that we are not topic specialists, so make sure you explain such that an interdisciplinary audience can follow).
  • We all discuss your topic and work.
  • You leave with plenty of good new ideas how to improve your work.

When and where?

The symposium takes place on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 (that is, the day before OpenSym proper will begin) at

Télécom Paris,

, Paris

The format of each slot is: 20 minutes presentation, 20 minutes discussion of this topic (including specific methods), 20 minutes discussion beyond this topic (including methods in general).
A projector (VGA) will be available. Please bring your own laptop.

Doctoral symposium program committee

To be announced